Recovery Strategy and Management Plan for Two NWT Species at Risk Finalized

YELLOWKNIFE (March 1, 2017) – The Northwest Territories (NWT)  Boreal Caribou Recovery Strategy and the NWT Amphibian Management Plan were released this week.

This action fulfills the Government of Northwest Territories’ responsibilities under the Species at Risk (NWT) Act and follows independent assessments completed by the NWT Species at Risk Committee and consensus agreements from the Conference of Management Authorities (CMA).

The CMA now has nine months to develop consensus agreements on the implementation of the NWT Boreal Caribou Recovery Strategy and NWT Amphibian Management Plan.

The Recovery Strategy and the Management Plan set out goals, objectives and recommended approaches for the conservation and recovery of boreal caribou and amphibians in the NWT. They do not result in any automatic prohibitions or protection for either species or their habitat.

The development of recovery strategies and management plans for species at risk in the NWT supports the 18th Legislative Assembly’s priorities of environmental stewardship and encouraging coordination and effectiveness in resource management and recognizing traditional knowledge and land claims agreements.

More information on species at risk in the NWT can be found on-line at www.nwtspeciesatrisk.ca

Quote:

“These actions to ensure a healthy and sustainable population of boreal caribou and a health and viable population of each amphibian species across their ranges in the NWT do not result in any automatic prohibitions or protections for these species or their habitat.”
Robert C. McLeod, Minister of Environment and Natural Resources

Quick Facts:

Boreal Caribou:

  • Were added to the NWT List of Species at Risk as a threatened species on February 27, 2014 because their small population size and an expected continuing decline in amount of their secured habitat.
  • Main threats to boreal caribou in the NWT area habitat loss and habitat fragmentation from human-caused disturbance (i.e. seismic lines and roads) and natural disturbances (wildland fires).
  • The recovery strategy was developed collaboratively and accepted by the boreal caribou management authorities (Wildlife Management Advisory Council (NWT); Gwich’in Renewable Resources Board; Sahtú Renewable Resources Board; Wek’èezhìi Renewable Resources Board; Tłı̨chǫ Government; and the Government of the Northwest Territories) with input from Aboriginal organizations and the public.

Amphibians:

  • Northern leopard frog and western toad were added to the NWT List of Species at Risk as threatened species on March 19, 2015 and February 25, 2016, respectively.
  • All amphibians in the NWT share several threats in common including diseases such as chytrid fungus and ranavirus.
  • Other threats include human activities that alter habitat, accidental human-caused mortality, increasing UV-B radiation, contaminants and climate change.
  • The management plan was developed collaboratively and accepted by the boreal caribou management authorities (Wildlife Management Advisory Council (NWT); Gwich’in Renewable Resources Board; Sahtú Renewable Resources Board; Wek’èezhìi Renewable Resources Board; Tłı̨chǫ Government; and the Government of the Northwest Territories) with input from Aboriginal organizations and the public.

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Media Contact:

Judy McLinton
Manager, Public Affairs and Communications
Environment and Natural Resources
Government of the Northwest Territories
Email: judy_mclinton@gov.nt.ca